"An artistic interpretation of text, free from the confines of specific political argument or exact historical flow"
By Ramzy Baroud


  • Keep Calm and Carry on you Medieval Peasants - 2013
  • Keep Calm and Carry on you Medieval Peasants - 3FF Show 2013
  • Ken O'Keefe, Prime Minister Henry Noa, President Obama, Prince William and Prince George
  • Keep Calm and Carry on you Medieval Peasants
  • Aithan Shapira & David Borrington
  • Sabras (Prickly Pear) - By Aithan Shapira
  • Sabras (Prickly Pear), detail - By Aithan Shapira
  • David Borrington & Aithan Shapira (Mending Wall - 2013)
  • Hundredth Monkey Effect T
  • Mending Wall - David Borrington's "Hundredth monkey effect" Aithan Shapira's "Sabras (Prickly Pear)" - 2013


The Walls Have Two Sides
By Artists Aithan Shapira and David Borrington: The Walls Have Two Sides project was juried as a feature exhibit by a panel including Andrew G. Williams from White Cube in conjunction with the multifaith organisation 3FF and Kings College London dedicated to generating conversation and understanding across cultures.

Borrington explored walls which we all encounter every day, but do not see in their entirety or even acknowledge as a wall at all. Starting with a wall of political, social, religious, celebrity culture which we live in and happily spend hours arguing between ourselves who is right and who is wrong. If we are not doing that luckily enough we have the X factor and Eastenders and the national ranks to keepers looking in the wrong direction. Welts we have a giant elephant in the room equal to the great state like entities of the Western world peering down on us all.

Borrington second piece "Hundredth Monkey Effect" was a realisation of the people have the power for peace and harmony and we just need to unite and stop listening to the elites propaganda and break down those walls in the Keep Calm and Carry on you Medieval Peasants picture and the domino effect of the realisation within the masses is instantaneous.

To explore "Keep Calm and Carry on you Medieval Peasants" please just click on the link and you will be taken to a larger pitcher you can explore with a more in-depth analysis of the artwork.

"Keep Calm and Carry on you Medieval Peasants"

The second piece "Hundredth Monkey Effect" was made in response to Shapira’s "concrete cactus walls" and the discussions which came about whilst working together. To explore please click on the link below.

"Hundredth Monkey Effect"

Shapira’s concrete cactus walls were specifically made after the prickly pear - or Israeli sabras - that has been used for some generations as a natural fence or border between neighbors to mark land and deter animals. “Original” sabras were brought over from Mexico to Israel to be planted. Furthermore, the title “sabras” is given to native Israelis that are likened to its fruit, prickly on the outside and sweet on the inside. “I wish I were a sabra, or at least from someplace” Shapira said at the opening reception, “perhaps the whole idea of the native Israeli plant is that it’s a product of migration”. “I wanted to make something larger than myself,” said Shapira, “something that could hurt me, like Matisse’s Oceania, the sea. He constructed those forms, those cut-outs, as a solid - a wall, something impenetrable.” Cactus thorns are embedded in Shapira’s concrete relief.

For more information about Shapira's work on this project please visit his website here.


  • Aithan Shapira and David Borrington At Kings College London
    Aithan Shapira and David Borrington At Kings College London
  • Skype presentation at Kings College and academic discussion.
    Skype presentation at Kings College and academic discussion.
  • Aithan Shapira and Dr Aaron Rosen
    Aithan Shapira and Dr Aaron Rosen
  • Keep Calm and Carry on you Medieval Peasants - Walls Have Two Sides, 2013
    Keep Calm and Carry on you Medieval Peasants - Walls Have Two Sides, 2013
  • Sabras (Prickly Pear) - Walls Have Two Sides, 2013
    Sabras (Prickly Pear) - Walls Have Two Sides, 2013
  • Sabras (Prickly Pear)
    Sabras (Prickly Pear)
  • Sabras (Prickly Pear) - Walls Have Two Sides, 2013
    Sabras (Prickly Pear) - Walls Have Two Sides, 2013
  • Walls Have Two Sides, Aithan Shapira and David Borrington
    Walls Have Two Sides, Aithan Shapira and David Borrington
  • Hundredth Monkey Effect
    Hundredth Monkey Effect
  • David Borrington, Artist
    David Borrington, Artist
  • Hundredth Monkey Effect
    Hundredth Monkey Effect
  • Aithan Shapira, Painter
    Aithan Shapira, Painter
  • Dr Aaron Rosen, Lecturer in Sacred Traditions and the Arts
    Dr Aaron Rosen, Lecturer in Sacred Traditions and the Arts
  • Ben Quash, Professor of Christianity and the Arts, King's College London
    Ben Quash, Professor of Christianity and the Arts, King's College London
  • 3FF Urban Dialogues and Collaboration with King's College London
    3FF Urban Dialogues and Collaboration with King's College London
  • Aithan Shapira and David Borrington "Opening night"
    Aithan Shapira and David Borrington "Opening night"




Exhibition Press Release:
Aithan Shapira and David Borrington met at the Royal College of Art in 2006 – both their work and lives are informed by edges, boundaries, and their practice in seeing multiple perspectives led to the formation of a lifetime friendship. This collaborative project sees the two artists working together for the first time and aims to challenge our concept of walls. Shapira and Borrington write that “Walls have two sides, though we live in a world accustomed to seeing only one at our homes, offices, hotels and underground stations without thinking what is happening on the other side”.

Exploring this idea Shapira and Borrington have built a wall installation whilst living on opposite sides of the Atlantic Ocean. With Shapira living in the United States and Borrington based in the UK, the artists have made artworks on opposite sides - one prior to viewing what the other artist was making and the other after communicating. In the artists’ words “we can live with two different ideas at once, in harmony, one doesn’t have to be better than the other or replace it”, this project questions our notion of walls and what they mean in our lives.

Borrington's work inherently celebrates his overcoming of dylexia and the mind's brilliance seeing the world through symbols and alternative methods of assimilating information. Shapira, first-generation American - father hailing ten-generations in Jerusalem and mother a refugee from Iraq to Israel - grew up a hybrid, either with two homes or no home depending on the perspective.

Shapira arrived in Borrington’s UK studio and unfolded piece of paper with Robert Frost’s Mending Wall. After reading it to David, Aithan followed, “a wall brought us together”. Whilst both artist share commonalities in their thinking, each took a distinct approach within their agreed parameters: Borrington's side of the wall is a drawing on panels depicting a layered matrix of geo- and socio- political figures and symbols and Shapira's side is a concrete cactus relief. After seeing each other's side, their second, joint wall constructed beside one another in the same studio was built as a tower. Beginning from opposite ends, Borrington's perspective looked down from the top of a scheming political pyramid and Shapira worked from the earth up.

A tremendous force over the course of building both walls was the artists' collaboration with scholar Dr. Aaron Rosen, Lecturer in Sacred Tradition and the Arts at King’s College, London. Dr. Rosen had access to each side of the wall and provided the glue. His further insight and challenging questions on theological, political, social 'walls' and their expression in the arts were among the tools the artists used to build their joint wall. The walls will be featured as part of the “Urban Dialogues” exhibit at Red Gallery, London, 2-14 October, 2013.

-Holly Jones and Eli Tamir
Urban Dialogues team, 3FF


Prices and more information please email the studio at info@dekkle.com

David Borrington MA RCA
"All that is needed for the forces of evil to succeed is for enough good men to remain silent."  Edmund Burke